Archive for the ‘pop culture’ Tag

Napo 2012   Leave a comment

The Voice (U.S. TV series)

The Voice (U.S. TV series) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Another NaPoWriMo has come and gone, and, as opposed to last year, I actually got about 5 poems written. There was a time when I was able to write 30 poems in 30 days, but age, 3 kids, and a serious illness have kept me from keeping up. So, I’m happy with what I got done.

 

National Poetry Month, National Poetry Writing Month for poets, is a great excuse to get off your butt and get writing if, like me, you’ve been going through a dry spell. It’s amazing how easy it is to just stop writing, telling yourself you’ll do it tomorrow, next week, maybe next month. And then you think it’ll be hard to get back in the game, you let the ideas pile up in the back of your mind, you catch up on watching the Voice.

 

But guess what? There are prompts everywhere, even in the showboating of Christina Aguilera and Adam Levine. One you pick up the pen, boot up the computer, and start writing, you wonder why you ever thought it would be so hard. It’s so easy! Like riding a bike! The ideas start flooding back through you, you start to revise, and you’ve got some fresh work to submit instead of the tired old poem you’ve already sent out a hundred times before.

 

It doesn’t matter if you get five, thirty, or just one really good, tight poem. The important thing is to turn off the TV and get writing!

 

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The View From Here   Leave a comment

http://www.magcloud.com/browse/Issue/78743

In May, in honor of Mother’s Day, The View From Here published my poem The Problem With Mother’s Day. Most of my poems on motherhood have a positive slant to them, this one not so much. There is dark humor here in this  little poem, because a lot of people, especially those that do not have children, idealize motherhood and paint a picture that mothers can do no wrong. Then, when some mother does something truly horrific, it’s plastered all over the news, talking heads decrying the tarnishing of the sanctity of Mother. For a mom who is not going to murder her children or sell them into white slavery, but does have her moments where the makeup isn’t pristine, the children aren’t angels on the playground, and dinner is leftover meatloaf, this idea that anything less than the Perfect Mommy is a sin is an uncomfortable one. So, I wrote a little poem about it, and the folks at The View From Here must have a mother or two amongst them, because they accepted it and published it.

Have some dark days? Not living up to the ideals others plaster all over you? Write about it this weekend, get it off your chest.

Barnwood International   1 comment

http://web.mac.com/tomkoontz/Site_30/Peterson.html

Barnwood published two poems of mine this year, “Searching for Suzanne on Youtube” and “Dying is an Art”, both poems inspired by the art of someone else. The first one is actually a tribute to two people, Leonard Cohen wrote the song Suzanne, but it’s Nina Simone’s cover of the song that inspired me to write. A lot of people, when I began to workshop this poem, questioned my use of Youtube, whether social media of any kind belonged in poetry. It’s an interesting debate, one I would welcome continuing in this venue, but ultimately I decided using Youtube set the timing of the poem at a date later than the initial recording in a way that added emotion to the discovery, without spelling out that it was the year 2010.

“Dying is an Art…” uses a quote from Sylvia Plath’s poem “Lady Lazarus” as its title. Reading her poem, and writing down the quote, opened up for me a topic that I had not heretofore written about with success, though I had tried many times. It was an incident in my life that was too emotional to write about head on, even years afterward. Plath has always been a favorite of mine, and I’ve read Lady Lazarus many times before the inspiration hit me to build on it with my own personal experiences with suicide.

As a writing prompt today, write out your favorite poem written by someone else, and see if you can find parallels in your own life. Write them out, and feel free to share.